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Aussie Fashion, Australian Designer, Australian Fashion

Laura Addis | Fashion Design Studio

November 23
Laura Addis from Fashion Design Studio at Ultimo TAFE Graduate Collection 2020

Laura Addis from Fashion Design Studio at Ultimo TAFE Graduate Collection 2020

In recent weeks, as I do every year, I have been liaising with the wonderful emerging designers from Fashion Design Studio as they move closer to what will be their greatest moment thus far, in their fashion careers. The FDS Graduate Runway. This is where their final collections are put on show celebrating the amazing detail of the many aspects which have made up their fashion design degrees.

The creation of their textile designs alone come into being from the most incredible sources … in one case, from the students own photography. Textiles, dyeing, devore, screen printing … are the basis of the incredible work which is consistently turned out, year in and year out at Fashion Design Studio.  The lecturers are full of heart, love and professionalism. Their enthusiasm and devotion to the industry they love and the people who choose to walk in their original footsteps is unending. To all of them, Alex Zehntner, Laura Washington, Julie, Mary and Narelle, I say “Thank You”. They are the unsung heroes in this story as they are the foundations of the success of the long list of Australian fashion icons that have stepped out of this institution many moons ago now. This year, we are entering a new paradigm for the Graduate Runway, in line with the release of my new project, The Ageless Runway, where I will be walking along with some other silver foxes 🙂 I think we are all aware now that fashion is for everyone, and we all want success for everyone in all sectors of the industry. This is our new future of Australian fashion, and it always starts with those who will literally form the future of our industry … the wonderful emerging talent. In the next little while on the Label Ministry platform I will be showcasing the FDS designers who have chosen to have the golden oldies walk for them.

Stay tuned for the next interview.

In the meantime designer Laura Addis from Manners Please, answered some of my questions …

Enjoy!

Continue Reading…

Aussie Fashion, Australian Designer, Australian Fashion

Claire Marrazza | Fashion Design Studio

November 21
Claire Marrazza and her label Nokoff, graduating student from Fashion Design Studio, Ultimo TAFE 2020

In recent weeks, as I do every year, I have been liaising with the wonderful emerging designers from Fashion Design Studio as they move closer to what will be their greatest moment thus far, in their fashion careers. The FDS Graduate Runway. This is where their final collections are put on show celebrating the amazing detail of the many aspects which have made up their fashion design degrees.

Claire’s name was incredibly familiar to me and as I pondered, I realised that she had been one of the wonderful volunteers at the Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom Runway developed and produced by yours truly in 2018 in collaboration with Universal Studios to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the Jurassic Park franchise at Australian Technology Park. The first collaboration of its kind for Australian fashion.

I asked Claire how she enjoyed the experience … 

CM

The 2018 Jurassic World event held at Australian Technology Park was the first big fashion event I ever got to experience/work behind the scenes at. The quick changes and energetic atmosphere were super new and exciting to me as a baby fashion student and the event was a great introduction to the inner workings of a runway. It gave me great insight into the organisation and work that goes into a show. It was an invaluable experience.

Meet Claire Merrazza and her label, Nokoff.

Enjoy!

Claire Marrazza and her label Nokoff, graduating student from Fashion Design Studio, Ultimo TAFE 2020

 

What was the driving force for you to study fashion design?

I have always been interested in clothes, dressing up and having fun with fashion. I wanted to study fashion design. It is exciting and is a way for us to express ourselves and be whatever we want to be. The expression of it is limitless.

What are your hopes and dreams for your chosen career as a fashion designer?

I hope to work in and to explore many different facets of the fashion world, from photography, styling and costume to designing, creating and making. I want to collaborate with and meet other creative people, to see lots of new places and to learn as much as I can about my field and about myself.

How would you describe your particular aesthetic and where did the inspiration come from for this aesthetic?

My aesthetic can be described as playful, novel, humorous and colourful. It is simply what comes naturally to me and is generally inspired by how I dress and what I admire in clothes and styling. My designs are a hyperbolic version of how I dress myself. Experimentation with imagery, colour and texture, as well as the idea of “playing dress-ups” are all central parts of my aesthetic.

Who do you see as your customer?

Anyone who wants to have fun with the way they dress and to feel less inhibited. My ideal customer has no age, no gender, and no body type — and  fashion the ideal of fashion which includes everyone is something I hope to encourage.

How much importance do you place on the theatre of “the runway”?

I think the runway is an exciting atmosphere. There are other ways to showcase clothing that are also welcoming and accessible to people, especially those that are new to exploring fashion.

What do you feel is the difference between a successful fashion designer and an unsuccessful fashion designer?

I think a successful fashion designer looks to themselves for reassurance of what they are doing, not to others for trends or profits. To me, staying true to oneself as a designer is what true success means, and it deeply enriches a designer’s work when they do so.

How do you feel the fashion industry has supported you so far?

So far, I have felt most supported by my peers and fellow creatives within the industry. The understanding we have of one another — especially through tough times of self-doubt and unsureness — is one of great importance in an industry so tough.

Claire Marrazza and her label Nokoff, graduating student from Fashion Design Studio, Ultimo TAFE 2020

What changes and level of support would you like to see for the future of the Australian fashion industry?

Increased opportunities for emerging designers is something that I think everyone would like to see in the near future. Graduates have lesser opportunity and are forced into working countless internships before a chance in a design role. The Australian fashion landscape has a lot of growth to do in terms of jobs, variety and inclusiveness and I hope to see that shift sooner rather than later.

What is the hardest thing you have had to face in your journey of the fashion industry so far?

Undoubtably, staying true to what you want to design can be really difficult due to outside pressures and constant exposure to other creatives design work. Not following trends can be really tricky but it is so worth it to stick with your personal vision and what you truly want to create.

What does Australian fashion mean to you and how do you see it in terms of contrast with other countries and regions of the world?

I feel that Australian fashion is a little bit timid and hesitant to jump into the more eccentric and experimental fashion seen in other parts of the world. Australian designers and students have some crazy big talent and I hope they can assist in helping Australia have a bigger standing on the global fashion stage.

What does the word fashion mean to you and the people around you?

Fashion is a means to connect with others and is also a way of exploring and connecting to your own identity through self-expression.

People often describe fashion as vacuous and unnecessary. What would you say to people who hold this opinion?

Unfortunately the fashion world can be very exclusive and polarising, but things are definitely changing. I think we need to keep pushing for a fashion world that includes everyone. To those who say fashion is trivial, I believe that it’s a matter of engaging with the parts of fashion that connects with ones sense of self.

Do you feel excited about your fashion career or do you feel that it is peppered with anxiety about the future?

It changes every day!

Like most creative careers, there are times of anxiety, but the outcomes and exciting times outweigh the fears.

Claire Marrazza and her label Nokoff, graduating student from Fashion Design Studio, Ultimo TAFE 2020

How do you feel about stepping out in the big wide world of fashion after having been in study mode for three years?

It’s scary, but I’m really not  fussed as long as I’m constantly creating and having a good time. I’m looking forward to learning and growing and expanding my skills. So much has changed for me in the last three years since I started studying fashion, and at this rate I can’t wait to see what’s in store for me in the future.

What are you looking forward to the most for your graduate runway and your moment of glory?

To see the work come together as a cohesive collection will be so rewarding. It’s surreal to finally see the illustrations on the page and the ideas in my head become a walking reality.

How do you feel about having older models walk in your show, when this has not been done before.

I’m really excited about it and I think it’s something that will become a permanent change in the industry, which is so important and fantastic.

So often older people are largely excluded from being represented in fashion and are expected to conform to a certain way of dressing.

Fashion should be fun for everyone, and self-expression doesn’t become less important after a certain age.

Amen!

What would you like to see as the format of the runway in the future?

I would love to see a rise in fashion displayed in showcases or performance-art like artist Vanessa Beecroft’s style. I think it’s another way that the designer can create a stronger and more cohesive vision for their collections that enhance the power of the garments.

The creation of their textile designs alone come into being from the most incredible sources … in one case, from the students own photography. Textiles, dyeing, devore, screen printing … are the basis of the incredible work which is consistently turned out, year in and year out at Fashion Design Studio.  The lecturers are full of heart, love and professionalism. Their enthusiasm and devotion to the industry they love and the people who choose to walk in their original footsteps is unending. To all of them, Alex Zehntner, Laura Washington, Julie, Mary and Narelle, I say “Thank You”. They are the unsung heroes in this story as they are the foundations of the success of the long list of Australian fashion icons that have stepped out of this institution many moons ago now. This year, we are entering a new paradigm for the Graduate Runway, in line with the release of my new project, The Ageless Runway, where I will be walking along with some other silver foxes 🙂 I think we are all aware now that fashion is for everyone, and we all want success for everyone in all sectors of the industry. This is our new future of Australian fashion, and it always starts with those who will literally form the future of our industry … the wonderful emerging talent. In the next little while on the Label Ministry platform I will be showcasing the FDS designers who have chosen to have the golden oldies walk for them.

Stay tuned for the next interview …

Until next time,

Jade xx

Label Ministry Logo

Aussie Fashion, Australian Designer, Australian Fashion

Thomas Anderson | Fashion Design Studio

November 18
Thomas Anderson Graduate Collection 2020 Fashion Design Studio TAFE Ultimo Sydney

In recent weeks, as I do every year, I have been liaising with the wonderful emerging designers from Fashion Design Studio as they move closer to what will be their greatest moment thus far, in their fashion careers. The FDS Graduate Runway. This is where their final collections are put on show celebrating the amazing detail of the many aspects which have made up their fashion design degrees.

Enjoy! Continue Reading…

Aussie Fashion, Australian Designer, Australian Fashion

Kiki Ollila | Fashion Design Studio

November 18
Mirka (Kiki) Ollilo and her graduate collection from Fashion Design Studio 2020

In recent weeks, as I do every year, I have been liaising with the wonderful emerging designers from Fashion Design Studio as they move closer to what will be their greatest moment to date … the FDS Graduate Runway. This is where their final collections are put on show celebrating the amazing detail of the many aspects which have made up the entirety thus far, in their fashion design degrees. Continue Reading…

Australian Designer, Australian Fashion, Australian Fashion Industry

Fashion Design Studio 2018

November 27
Models standing backstage at the Fashion Design Studio Graduate Runway 2018 at Ultimo TAFE

Tonight, I had the pleasure of attending the Fashion Design Studio’s 2018 annual graduate runway.

The eagerly awaited fashion spectacle which showcases the most celebrated of their students.  The outstanding and often times breathtaking talent is awe inspiring and one must always remember that we are, in that very moment, bearing witness to those who will be the future heroes of the Australian fashion industry.

May I open with this.

Fashion design is not for the faint hearted.

Models standing backstage with Jade Cosgrove, CEO Label Ministry at the Fashion Design Studio Graduate Runway 2018 at Ultimo TAFE

Photography | Romualdo Nubla Studio MOR+ | Fashion Design Studio Graduate Runway 2018

Continue Reading…

Australian Fashion Industry, Editorial, Global Fashion Industry, New Zealand Fashion Week

Orange Is The New Black

October 15
A model walks the runway in a design by Ruscoe during the New Generation Emerging Couture show during New Zealand Fashion Week 2018 at Viaduct Events Centre on August 28, 2018 in Auckland, New Zealand (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images)

If you’ve been keeping up with our latest articles, you already know that Label Ministry ventured to lovely Auckland for New Zealand Fashion Week in August this year.

While most of Jade’s mission at NZFW revolved around the production of the unreal runway show for Heaven Swimwear I was lucky enough to have some time to kick back in the front-row of several other shows.

While I relished my time at every show, one label stood out among the rest. An… orange diamond in the (not-at-all) rough, if you will …

Enjoy xx

Continue Reading…

Australian Fashion Industry, Editorial, Global Fashion Industry, New Zealand Fashion Week

Romance with Rachel Mills

October 5
Rachel Mills at New Zealand Fashion Week 2018 in Auckland, seen and written about by intern Sophie.

As you know Label Ministry recently visited New Zealand for fashion week. I was there to cover and work on the Heaven swimwear show for which I crafted the involvement of none other than the amazing Imogen Anthony, beauty extraordinaire and one of the best walkers of the catwalk I have ever seen.

This year for the first time, I travelled with Sophie, my wonderful intern who will, as I explained in a previous article be contributing to Label Ministry from now on. It is a most gleeful subject that Label Ministry is growing at an incredibly exciting rate and Sophie’s experience in the Australian fashion industry is greatly welcomed and appreciated. She is experienced in fashion public relations and writing as I am sure you will find evident in her article below on Rachel Mills …

Say a big hello!

Jade X

Sophie van den Bogaerde

Sophie van den Bogaerde

Rachel Mills gently set in motion day two of New Zealand Fashion week this Tuesday gone. They are an Auckland-based womenswear label committed to sustainability and the sole use of local manufacturers. The label is based on seeking to “transform the process of getting dressed into a ritual rather than a chore.” Their designs can only be described as gracefully modern and charming, and the Rachel Mills Fashion week session captured this entirely.

Rachel Mills at New Zealand Fashion Week 2018 in Auckland, seen and written about by intern Sophie.

The intimate installation was essentially a room for spectators to walk through, broken up by the blocking of different models against hanging material. It took place in The Studio of the ANZ Viaduct Events Centre, inducing a sense of ease in all of us who, (at first hazily), wandered through the room. The studio itself had high ceilings and a definite industrial sense about it, which made it feel, when set against the installation, like a New York loft apartment or a quiet street when one meandered within it.

Rachel Mills at New Zealand Fashion Week 2018 in Auckland, seen and written about by intern Sophie.

Almost every piece in the collection was simplistic but embellished tastefully with romantic wraps, folds, relaxed fits, clinched-waists and tie details. The colour palette mostly stuck to light-greys, whites, and neutrals, with the occasional delightful pop of lemon or electric blue. The result: A willowy, sophisticated, feminine, effortlessly-cool vibe. The pieces on show largely tailored to smart-casual looks, but could be suitable for any occasion that calls for an understated yet chic beauty.

Rachel Mills at New Zealand Fashion Week 2018 in Auckland, seen and written about by intern Sophie.

The piece that stood out most for me was the ‘Divided Pants’ in Harlequin spot and organic multi check, available now online for pre-order. (IMAGE: Divided Pant.jpg). The pants are split into two different halves: A soft cotton check in pale purple and white, and a silky black and white polka dot. They can be styled to look almost like a wrap maxi-skirt, or just left looking like trousers. I don’t quite understand the mechanics behind the pants and how they transform, but they were very flattering on model Diana Anuenue who sported them styled as a skirt on the day, and something I’m dying to get my hands on.

Rachel Mills at New Zealand Fashion Week 2018 in Auckland, seen and written about by intern Sophie.

 

The room was dimmed, while the beautiful wistful-looking models were lit up against sheer curtains that evoked the feeling of a lazy Sunday morning. Most notable among them was stunning model Raina Masters, who commanded the room with her warm disposition and enthusiasm to quietly work with those photographing her, making for an enjoyable and personable event so different to that of many other installations.

Rachel Mills at New Zealand Fashion Week 2018 in Auckland, seen and written about by intern Sophie.

Cinematic projections played out against the fabric backdrops, with the enchanting live vocals of Lilly Carron weaving a post-breakup mood that was utterly dreamy and captivating. It was as though Lilly’s presence was a ‘final destination’ within the installation, as at first it seemed that the vocals were recorded. Alas- no. Lilly’s voice really was that hauntingly beautiful live, and added the final touch needed to concoct Rachel Mills’ magical session. Lilly Carron is certainly one to keep an eye on for those interested in the music scene looking to support local vocalists as well as local fashion labels.

Rachel Mills at New Zealand Fashion Week 2018 in Auckland, seen and written about by intern Sophie.

The whole thing had me wanting to own and wear every piece on show, while sitting in a cafe, gazing out a window at rainy streets with Lilly’s rendition of Etta James’ ‘I Would Rather Go Blind’ on repeat.

Rachel Mills at New Zealand Fashion Week 2018 in Auckland, seen and written about by intern Sophie.

If it was Rachel Mills’ intention to have me wanting to stay a while with a book and a hot cup of tea…

She certainly succeeded.

Rachel Mills | Instagram

Until next time,

Sophie xx

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Australian Fashion Industry, Beauty, Editorial, Health

The Grey Haired Revolution

September 27
Rebecca O'Hearn, founder of Smart. Casual. Classic.

This year I was fortunate enough to meet a wonderful inspiring woman by the name of Rebecca O’Hearn, the founder of a website which you may have heard of … Smart. Casual. Classic.

A website, refreshingly aimed at the 45+ market age and imperfection is almost the centre point for all it represents and encompasses. A wonderful juxtaposition of style, health, and fashion for the older market.

With a background in Australian magazines and media, she spent seven years with FHM where her position culminated as the Fashion and Grooming Editor. She then went on to be the Fashion Editor of Woman’s Day, and during her time there, Bauer launched Yours magazine for which she became Fashion Editor also. In 2017 Bauer closed the title at which time she directed her passions online to her current website.

Bec describes Smart. Casual. Classic as the “market out there who are starving for relevant content for the mature Australian woman”.

Continue Reading…

Australian Designer, Australian Fashion Industry, MBFWA

BACKSTAGE #mbfwa2018

June 14
Backstage at Fashion Design Studio at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week in Sydney at Carriageworks 2018.

Backstage at Fashion Design Studio at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week in Sydney at Carriageworks 2018.

Fashion Week is always special. And strangely, always, each and every year, in a different way.

For me, arriving there one year since the last time felt strange.  So much has happened in one year, and quite literally months of my life had been devoted to a very important project, both for myself and for the Australian fashion industry.  Those of you who know me, and now there are many, you will know that that project was none other than the Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom Runway, held in April of this year. I was thrilled to be able to work with, encourage, and develop the designers with whom I was so closely aligned on this project, as well as developing the concept in this country of working with international big guns who see benefit in fashion collaboration.  This has long been my vision and I hope to see much more of it in the future.

Continue Reading…