Browsing Tag

tattoos

Australian Fashion Industry, Editorial, Photography, Styling

Karlstrom Creatives

November 8
Picture of a girl in black and white with large round sunglasses and long brown hair.
Model with blue hair standing in colourful skirt and top with high heeled white shoes for a campaign shoot.

Karlstrom Creatives | Photography | Peter Karlstrom | Stylist | Leigh Karlstrom

 

 

The passion and love comes from creating something that is yours. We see what we do as a story and the characters just come to life.

Petter Karlstrom

 

One of my most favourite topics within the realm of Australian fashion is the creative team. We often take for granted the contribution that these teams make to the success of independent designers, important events, and the general gorgeous hype that our industry rocks. No other creative team is more deserving of this kudos which is the topic of my latest editorial.

Who are they? Karlstrom Creatives.

I absolutely love the work of Petter and Leigh Karlstrom.

They have reached, what I consider to be, the pinnacle of creative prowess.

Petter and Leigh Karlstrom are the dynamic duo. Quite literally. Petter is the photographer,  Leigh the stylist.

I first discovered their work when I interviewed the amazing Chisato Chris Arai, another creative genius. Definitely one of Australia’s most coveted makeup artists. If you have not discovered Chris Arai yet, do yourself the pleasure of checking out her work. Just navigate through the menu to her article. Truly inspiring.

But back to the Karlstrom duo. Their work is fresh, inspiring, different, engaging, and pure creativity. It is the epitome of imagination and fantasy, and I love it!

I can’t sing the praises of these people enough. I know, I know. You think I say that about everyone I interview. Well I do try to sing everybody’s praises. That’s true. But it is never undeserved, as I am blessed to be granted interviews with the very coolest of people!

Every now and again, you come across people and talent that is truly special. And this article is about these human gemstones.

Petter told me, “the streets inspire us. Characters and spaces. I usually get an idea from being at a cool location and then the rest just comes naturally”.

Continue Reading…

Australian Fashion Industry, Editorial, Fashion Designer, Global Fashion Industry, Interview

Frederick Jenkyn

September 26
Model | Kelly Hockey Place | London Designer | Frederick Jenkyn Photographer | Chris Fatseas

Frederick Jenkyn, Australian Fashion Designer, TAFE Ultimo. The Innovators.

As all of my devoted followers already know, earlier this year, I had the pleasure of perusing on mass, the breathtaking young smorgasbord of talent that Australia serves up each and every year at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week. After the week long event, which is the highlight of the years for all Australian fashion devotees, I methodically work my way through the incredible mix of entrepreneurial youth, offering them the opportunity to publish an affordable and effective public relations interview to promote their names and their emerging brands.

Frederick Jenkyns collection was outstanding. I met him the very day of the unveiling of his collection, but am bringing you this interview after corresponding with him in London, his new place of residence.

As I am sure you are aware, and if you are not, please consider this.

Our emerging designers are quite literally our fashion future.  They represent the group of people who will lead us strongly, both locally and internationally, in the ethical and sustainable production of our beloved fashion industry. Young people such as Frederick will most likely be the names behind your choice of dressing and the other interiors of our design lives for decades to come. It is essential that we support them, read about them, buy their product and offer them our gratitude and encouragement.

Please remember to share  the love.

Australian fashion is depending on you …

 

Meet Frederick Jenkyn.

In five years? I want to have my own studio with pattern makers/design assistants. A machinist and a social media/online manager.

Rolls and rolls of fabrics and a stock room filled to the brim.

I would like to think I’ll be complaining about needing more space. But then I will think, I need to pay for the embroidery for next season so it’s not a good time to upgrade.

I will only wear black. In case someone visits the studio and I won’t look a mess.

And in the bottom draw of my desk, that looks like a filing draw, I’ll keep some throw rugs for the “before show” all-nighters.

Frederick Jenkyn

 

Model Kelly Hockey modelling in London for Frederick Jenkyn. Photographer Chris Fatseas.

Here is Frederick Jenkyn’s story so far …

Frederick Jenkyn as a brand emphasises wearable innovation through unconventional textiles and hand crafted detailing traversing the borderline between couture extravagance and everyday wearability.

Frederick Jenkyn

 

Continue Reading…

Australian Fashion Industry, Editorial, Global Fashion Industry, Photography

Lights. Cameras. Heaven.

June 28
Bill Cunningham, New York photographer. Passed away at age 87 years after a stroke.

“The problem is I’m not a good photographer. To be perfectly honest, I’m too shy. Not aggressive enough. Well, I’m not aggressive at all. I just loved to see wonderfully dressed women, and I still do. That’s all there is to it.”

– Bill Cunningham

This morning, as I drank my morning coffee and dreamily looked out the window, my eyes rested on a postcard sitting near me. The title was, “The King Is Dead”.

It is not often that I am totally affected by the passing of someone whom I have never met, spoken to, or even seen in person.

But this time was different.

Saturday, June 25 2016 was a sad day for the global fashion industry.

I woke that morning, Sydney time, with a heavy heart, to find that the iconic Bill Cunningham, the famous bicycle pedalling street photographer, and dedicated columnist for the New York Times, will no longer be seen in mid-town New York capturing his special version of visual fashion delights.

Bill has crossed over, and is now travelling on a runway of a different kind.

Bill Cunningham was special. Eccentric. Dedicated. One of a Kind. And. He Will Be So Missed.

It has literally taken me days to comprehend that he is gone. At least from my current world.

And so this post is dedicated to Bill.

A man I never met, but a man that I know has affected so many lives with his work. As I write these words I realise what an incredible thing that is.  To actually be such a contributory pillar of artistic genius that causes fashion lovers across the world to mourn his passing.

Bill is someone that I would have loved to have met, even briefly. For whatever reason, that was not to be. But it actually doesn’t matter because I hold such gratitude for the contribution he has made to my life. And to my own passion for fashion.

And there is that word again. Contribution.  Ahh yes! That word has been spoken about a lot lately, post Mercedes Benz Fashion Week, Sydney 2016.

Contribution.
Continue Reading…

Australian Fashion Industry, Fashion Designer, Interview, Melbourne Fashion Festival

Lois Hazel

March 10

 

With a philosophy grounded in a desire to create timeless pieces of quality, texture and intricacy, Lois Hazel, aims to bring honest pieces with a unique touch to her customers.

 

Model standing on Sorrento Beach in blue wide leg pants with a white top with shoe string straps with bare feet with the headland behind her.

Model | Sarah Baxter | Photographer | Kim Mennen | HMUA | Emma Gillett

 

Lois Hazel graduated from RMIT’s Bachelor of Design in Fashion with first class honours in 2012. She then left Australia to work for the New York design house, Marchesa, and Iris van Herpen in Amsterdam. Lois returned to Australia, and her home town Melbourne in 2014. She launched her first capsule accessories range, and then her debut collection “Frayed” in 2015. She is passionate about ethical and sustainable practices, and hopes to bring positive change to the fashion industry by donating five percent of her profits to One Girl Australia.

LM

How would you describe your label?

LH

Timeless, textural pieces with unique detailing.

LM

I believe you find inspiration in “subversive art”. What does this mean for your garments and your collection as a whole.

LH

I think for me it helps me build my collections around a concept. Starting with a  point of interest such as pleating, a certain texture or maybe even just a point of inspiration taken from the world around me.  I feel I am able to really push my boundaries as a designer and come up with something unique and original.

Model wearing Lois Hazel. Long maxi skirt, cream skirt with frill hem detail over the long skirt, blue sleeveless top with frill peplum and navy three quarter length jacket with wide lapel.

Model | Sarah Baxter | Photographer | Kim Mennen | HMUA | Emma Gillett

LM

Do you believe that fashion and art belong together on the runway?

LH

Definitely, I feel the runway gives designers a platform where they get to create a world.  To show their pieces in complete fullness and how they were envisioned. It gives us a way to draw our audiences in and let them see into our world.

LM

I believed you have worked with Marchesa, Iris Van Herpen, Marianne Kemp and ByBorre. Was there a common thread of inspiration that developed your fashion ethos?

LH

I wouldn’t say there was a common thread, but rather through each of these experiences I discovered more and more about who I am as a designer. Every single one of these designers and artists let me see how they worked. I was able to discover so many different techniques and systems. I found ways to do things and also found ways to do things that in theory shouldn’t be done.  From everything I learnt I was able to create a practice that worked well in and that I was proud of.

LM

Describe your time and experience at the Paris American Academy.

LH

My time in Paris was truly magical. It is such an incredible city and to be able to study there was amazing. I was able to learn from people who had worked for one of my idols, Madame Gres, and learned to appreciate what couture has brought us in fashion.

Relating back to the question about art and fashion, I feel my time in Paris really let me appreciate the art that has gone into and still goes into fashion.

I do believe fashion is a form of art, especially when you truly take the time to appreciate the aspects of design, construction and even the mathematics involved.

Model wearing Lois Hazel in a beach setting with honeycomb caves behind her in a loose fitting v neck top with matching skirt.

Model | Sarah Baxter | Photographer | Kim Mennen | HMUA | Emma Gillett

LM

What do you love about the Australia fashion industry?

LH

One thing I really admire is the community we have here. I am very lucky to be surrounded by such a creative community  where so many are willing to help and share ideas with each other. Helping each other out is extremely important.  Being invited to show at this years Virgin Australia Fashion Festival as part of the Discovery Runway indicates the support Victoria has for young designers.

LM

What do you feel we could do better?

LH

By bringing more production and manufacturing back to Australia. I would love to be able to contact industrial weavers from Coburg, or work with local milling companies.

I remember when I was living in Amsterdam I caught a train to the Tilburg Textile museum. I received the opportunity to learn how to weave my own fabric, and how to use knitting mills and other incredible machinery. During my time in New York I was blessed to learn about pleating, beading, fabric dyeing, as well as enjoying the broad choice of available fabrics.

LM

Do you feel that the Australian consumer could better support emerging designers?

LH

It’s always hard with new labels, as people don’t really know much about them.

Obviously I would love everyone to support emerging designers and buy our stuff straight away.

But I do understand it is essential to build trust and a good rapport with consumers.

In saying that though we are lucky to have individuals like yourself.

LM

Thanks Lois! Glad you appreciate my work!!! Very sweet! 

For everyone who would like to support emerging designers, follow Label Ministry!

Other people who support the emerging market are, The Fashion Journey, Broadsheet, and other publications who are helping us get our names out there.

 

Model standing on Sorrento Beach in blue wide leg pants with a blue top with peplum flare design with bare feet with the headland behind her.

Model | Sarah Baxter | Photographer | Kim Mennen | HMUA | Emma Gillett

LM

What does Melbourne mean for you?

LH

My Home. I really love Melbourne, it is a beautiful city and has a lot to offer. I feel very lucky to live here and have it as my base.

LM

Your designs have a freshness and an innocence to them. Have you deliberately designed your collection in this way?

LH

I wouldn’t say I have. For me I let my designs just happen. It’s always very free at the beginning and then once I have a concept in mind I just go with it and see where it ends up. I don’t have a set direction that I want to take my collections in but rather just see where they take me. Maybe that sense of natural wondering brings this innocence and freshness about.

They slowly evolve out of a random thought, an image, a beautiful textile or a moment of clarity.

LM

Where do you source your fabrics?

LH

I mainly source my fabrics from a New Zealand company called Wall Fabrics who have an office in Melbourne.  I was also lucky to find an incredible fabric store in Bali last year. It was there that I found a lot of the silks seen in “LINEAR”.  I hope one day to go back and find some more of these beauties! One day I hope to be able to create my own textiles working alongside world renowned weavers.

 

Model wearing Lois Hazel in a beach setting with honeycomb caves behind her in a loose fitting v neck dress with frill hemline.

Model | Sarah Baxter | Photographer | Kim Mennen | HMUA | Emma Gillett

LM

What is your opinion on ethical and sustainable fashion?

LH

I think it is extremely important, and I am happy that it has become an important topic for discussion. As a designer I have a responsibility to look after all my contacts. Fashion is such a powerful and influential industry. If any of us were to disregard the impact it has on us environmentally and socially we would bring much harm to the world around us.

Ethical and sustainable fashion practices are a necessary discussion for both individuals within the industry and consumers.

LM

Where are you garments made?

LH

I am proud to say that all Lois Hazel garments are made here in Melbourne. I am lucky to work with a variety of different companies as well as have the time to produce a number of styles in house here in Fitzroy.

LM

Who is the Lois Hazel women?

LH

I like to see her as fun, and wanting to invest in her wardrobe. She is aware of the world around her, and takes interest in the effect her choices have.

Model at Sorrento beach standing barefoot on the sand wearing a Lois Hazel cream skirt and cream top with shoe string straps.

Model | Sarah Baxter | Photographer | Kim Mennen | HMUA | Emma Gillett

LM

What defines the Lois Hazel label?

LH

I would say a desire to create timeless pieces with unique detailing that were developed and produced in a sustainable and ethical manner.

LM

Do you believe that Australian women dress well?

LH

I do, and I love how here in Melbourne you see so many different styles.

LM

If you could bring about any particular changes within the Australian fashion industry, what would they be?

LH

Bring more production back to Australia. Not only in manufacturing but also in fabric production, dyeing, and weaving.

We have so much potential, talent and live in such a unique land.

The back view of model standing on Sorrento Beach in blue wide leg pants with a white top with shoe string straps with bare feet with the headland behind her.

Model | Sarah Baxter | Photographer | Kim Mennen | HMUA | Emma Gillett

LM

What is your view of fashion collaborations?

LH

I think they are great! There are so many people out there with different views and talent! Being able to work together really allows for things to mature and evolve.

LM

What do you see as the future of the Australia fashion industry?

LH

I see consumers becoming proud to wear Australian made goods!

I also hope to see the recognition of more of our talent around the world.

We are lucky to have individuals like Ellery, Zimmerman and Maticevski paving the way.

LM

Who are your favourite international designers and why?

LH

I wouldn’t say I have a solid favourite, but I admire the works of a number of different designers. I love the couture collections from fashion houses such as Dior, Chanel and Valentino. Their work is inspirational.

LM

Do you see yourself as expanding to overseas markets?

LH

I do, and I hope that this year I’ll be able to start the journey.

Studio shot of the back view of model Dijok Mai standing in a black Lois Hazel jacket.

Photographer | Anthony Tosello | Stylist | Julia Sarteschi | HMUA | Brooke Pearson | Creative Direction | Violette Snow

LM

Do you think raising the awareness of the Australian consumer would help to ease the difficulties of being an emerging designer?

LH

Definitely. Consumers are what really run this industry. Their support of emerging designers would go a long way to helping us achieve more faster and easing the pressure we feel in the early years.

LM

If you could suggest ways to support emerging designers as a whole, what would they be?

LH

I think making the time to go to events like the Discovery Runway or keeping an eye out in the Fashion Journal for us, and any blogs that focus on introducing emerging designers to the public.

LM

Yes! Yes! and Yes!  Bring it on!

LM

What is your view of social media. Do you see it as mostly positive?

LH

I think it is great! Especially Instagram which has already brought me so many great opportunities and linked me up with a variety of different people.

As a emerging designer my budget is limited for marketing, so having a platform like Twitter, Instagram and Facebook is wonderful.

 

Studio shot of model Dijok Mai sitting on a white stool modelling Lois Hazel, wearing blue wide pant and white top with shoe string straps, flat white sandals with black elastic detail.

Photographer | Anthony Tosello | Stylist | Julia Sarteschi | HMUA | Brooke Pearson | Creative Direction | Violette Snow

LM

What is your opinion of people who describe the fashion industry as fake?

LH

I love the fashion industry, but unfortunately it does have its ‘fake’ moments. Only a small percentage of those involved really get the credit they deserve. I really want to make sure that in my practice people get the credit they deserve. I want to show my consumers not only where everything is made, but also that they can see it is a team effort.

LM

How do you feel about fast fashion, and the impact it has on a label such as yours?

LH

My hope for fast fashion is to see it become more sustainable and ethical.

Obviously it does make it harder for me when something can be offered at a more affordable price, but I feel as an emerging designer I have the opportunity to do things differently and create a uniquely diversified product.

LM

So my lovelies, the next time you’re thinking of buying something, check out Lois Hazel.

Accreditations:

Photographers | Anthony Tosello | Kim Mennen | Kristy Milliken

Stylist | Julia Sarteschi

HMUA | Brooke Pearson | Emma Gillett

Creative Direction | Violette Snow

Models | Dijok H. Mai | Sarah Baxter | Georgia Asapwell | Madeleine Rose Tudor

Other:

Hessian Magazine

Folk Collective

One Girl Australia

Iris Van Herpen

ByBorre

Broadsheet

Until next time,

Jade xx

website_logo3.5@2x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commentary

Generation Inked

February 8

4615249233_b1b155c8e2

Featured Image: Full-body tattoo byMohamed El Dahshan. Photo from Flickr.

Inked. Yep. It looks like tattoos are here to stay. Or so it seems.

When the day arrives and tattoos are no longer fashionable, there will be a sea of people and I mean, a sea of people, heading to … well, the place that removes tattoos. Whatever that place is. Cosmetic surgeons or beauty salons with laser machines? Or maybe people will go back to the tattoo parlour they went to in the first place. If I was enterprising in a different kind of way, I would be thinking about opening up a tattoo removal shop, because if my predictions are anything to go by, I reckon the tattoo removalists are going to get busy. Really busy.

Continue Reading…